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HP Pavilion dv7 Entertainment Notebook PC series support

TV Cable and Connection Types

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This document pertains to HP Plasma and LCD TVs.
Where you connect your device (VCR players, DVD players, high-definition signal equipment such as HP HDTV tuners, HP Media Center PCs, or PCs) to your TV depends on the equipment type and the cables you are using. Use the following chart as a guide for connecting your equipment and cable to your TV. Several connection types have been listed, but the connections on the back of your TV may differ depending on model type.
Cable typeConnector(s) and notes
HDMI

HDMI stands for High-Definition Multimedia Interface. An HDMI connection is used to transfer high definition digital video and high definition audio signals. Ideal for HDTV, HDMI supports standard, enhanced, or high-definition video and audio in a smaller cable size than DVI.

To use an HDMI connection, simply attach the HDMI cable to the first possible HDMI connectors on the TV and source device.

Figure 1: HDMI connectors


NOTE:To achieve better quality with an HDMI connection try to keep the length of the cable less than 16 feet (5 meters).


NOTE:HDMI is compatible with DVI video. You can use an HDMI-to-DVI adapter plug to make a connection if your source device only has a DVI connector (but you must connect audio separately).


NOTE:HDMI supports High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP).


NOTE:HDMI does not process Dolby Digital audio.
DVI

DVI stands for Digital Visual Interface. A DVI connection is used to transfer high definition digital video signals without audio. A separate audio connection must be used.

DVI cables have been used primarily in monitors but can also be found in HDTV receivers, DVD players, computers, or other video equipment that demand better signal quality over standard.

Over time, various types of DVI connectors and cables have been created. If you do not know the differences between DVI types, setting up your video and audio equipment can be difficult and frustrating. At this time, DVI typically comes in five different types: DVI-A, DVI-D single link, DVI-D dual link, DVI-I single link, and DVI-I dual link. If you plan on using DVI, it is important to know the following types and their differences before purchasing equipment:

  • DVI-A is designed only for analog video signals. You should not attempt to use a DVI-A cable with a digital TV.
    Figure 2: DVI-A
  • DVI-D single link is designed for digital video signals and can support high-definition display resolutions up to 1,920 x 1,080.
    Figure 3: DVI-D single link
  • DVI-D dual link is designed for digital video signals and can support high-definition display resolutions up to 2,048 x 1,536.
    Figure 4: DVI-D dual link
  • DVI-I single link is designed for digital and analog video signals and can support high-definition display resolutions up to about 1,920 x 1,080 @ 60Hz.
    Figure 5: DVI-I single link
  • DVI-I dual channel is designed for digital video signals and can support high-definition display resolutions up to 2,048 x 1,536 @ 60Hz.
    Figure 6: DVI-I dual link


NOTE:To achieve better quality with a DVI connection, use a DVI-D dual link cable. Try to keep the length of the cable less than 16 feet (5 meters). You can also use a DVI-I dual link cable to achieve the same quality, but all devices must support the DVI-I connection type.


To use DVI, connect the DVI cable to the matching socket on the TV and the video output device (computer, DVD, set-top box).

Figure 7: DVI-D


NOTE:DVI supports High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP).
Component

Component video is an analog connection that is capable of supporting a high-definition video signals (video resolutions greater than 480i).

Component video comes with three separate cable strands for video; red, blue, and green/turquoise. Some cables may also have two more red and white strands for audio.

Used by HDTV receivers, DVD players, and other devices equipped with a YPbPr component connections.

To use, connect each colored cable end into the corresponding connector of the same color.

Red into the red Pr-connector (YPbPr1 or Cr1/Pr1) Video In. Green into the green Y-connector (YPbPr1 or Y1) Video In. Blue into the blue Pb-connector (YPbPr1 or Cb1/Pb1) Video In.

Figure 8: Component connection


Component video uses separate RCA audio connections to transfer standard analog stereo signals.

Figure 9: Component with audio connectors


Connect the red and white cables into the red and white audio connections. Red represent the right channel or right speaker), and white represents the left channel/speaker (L).

Figure 10: Audio
S-video

S-video is a better choice over standard composite video cables for delivering a better standard TV picture, but cannot deliver high definition video.

An S-video cable has a round connector with four pins. Used to connect a DVD player, VCR, cable or satellite tuner/decoder, or a game console equipped with a S-video connector.

To use, connect into the video inputs on the TV and source device: S-video or AV1/SV1. Separate audio cables must be used.

Composite

Composite (not to be confused with component) is the most common and probably the most compatible connection type. Composite offers the least in video quality and performance when compared against the other video connection types on this page.

Composite video connections are typically used to transfer standard analog video signals. They are not used for HDTV or digital video purposes.

To use a composite connection, connect the video cable (yellow) into the video connection on the TV and the source device (usually labeled as Video, AV, or AV1).

Figure 11: Video


Composite video uses separate RCA audio connections to transfer standard analog stereo signals.

Connect the red and white cables into the red and white audio connections next to the video cable. Red represent the right channel or right speaker), and white represents the left channel/speaker (L).

Figure 12: Audio
Digital optical audio

Digital optical audio can support S/Pdif and carries a digital audio as an optical signal. This cable type is capable of delivering much higher quality signals while supporting more speakers (5.1).

Used by DTVs, home theater systems, digital entertainment centers, PCs and some game consoles.

To use, connect a digital optical cable into the connectors on the TV and source device. If both the TV and connected device (receiver) is capable of using Dolby Digital audio, select Dolby Digital audio from the menus of each device, otherwise, select PCM audio or Digital Audio.

VGA

VGA stands for Video Graphics Array and is primarily used by PCs to deliver VGA compatible analog display resolutions. A VGA connector has three rows of five pins.

To use, connect into the VGA video connector on the back of the computer or other VGA device. A separate audio cable must be used. Once connected, set the computer or source device to a display resolution that is compatible for both the TV and the PC.

RCA stereo audio

Most televisions, video camcorders, VCRs, and videodisc players have RCA connectors for stereo audio.

To use, connect the red and white cables into the right and left RCA audio connector on the TV (AV section)and source devices. Red represent the right channel or right speaker), and white represents the left channel/speaker (L).

Figure 13: RCA Audio
Coaxial or RF

RF or coaxial cable is used mainly for antennas but is also supported by most cable and satellite set top boxes and VCRs. May be used with set-top boxes if no other choice is available. Cable screws onto RF connector.

To connect, insert the end of the cable over the connector hand tighten the retaining nut to secure. A separate audio cable must be used.

i.LINK is a type of interface connection that uses a serial transfer system to transfer multimedia, such as digital images and sound, between devices with i.LINK terminals.

For certain models, only D-VHS decks, AV HDD recorders, and Blu-ray Disc recorders can be connected to the TVs with i.LINK. Device recognition, control, recording, and playback operations may not be possible on some devices. Devices such as DVD recorders, digital video cameras, PCs, or PC peripheral devices may not meet the specifications for the TV and if so, cannot work with i.LINK.

Figure 14: i-Link connector
PictBridge

The PictBridge connector allows photos to be printed using a compatible PictBridge-equipped USB printer.

To print photos, first view your photographs (from a camera card in the memory card reader as an example). Then, connect the printer to the television using the USB cable from the printer. Once connected, the TV and printer recognize each other and the TV displays on-screen instructions. Follow the on-screen instructions to print your photos.

Figure 15: PictBridge connector on TV
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